We are certified inspectors offering mold inspections and indoor air quality testing. 
Your local inspector is both an IAQ or indoor air quality and mold specialist offering a wide array of detection services for mold, moisture, humidity, condensation, indoor pollutants or chemicals in the air and odors in, near, and around, all Southeast Florida counties including Palm Beach - Dade - Broward - Fort Pierce - and Monroe Counties, and towns including - Vero Beach- Port St Lucie - Stuart - West Palm Beach - Boca Raton - Jupiter -  Palm Beach - Wellington - Coral Springs - Plantation - Davie - Sunrise - Weston -Aventura - North Miami - Doral - Miami - Coconut Grove - Coral Gables - Miami Beach - Kendall - Key Largo - Islamorada - and Key West.
 

 

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Below is a list of just some of the chemicals that may be found during air testing at your office or home. It is not unusual to find many of these chemicals indoors at low levels, but elevated levels of any chemical can occuren and can cause health problems.

 

 

111-trichloroethane 
It is used as a solvent. 
 

 

1,4-dichlorobenzene
It is used to control moths, molds, and mildew, and to deodorize restrooms and waste containers. Its primary use is in most modern mothballs in which it is a replacement for the more traditional naphthalene. 

 
   
Methyl ethyl ketone
It is also known as (MEK) or 2-Butanone, a manufactured organic chemical but it is also present in the environment from natural sources. Typically found not during home indoor air quality investigations, but during commercial IAQ testing. It is a colorless liquid with a sharp, sweet odor. It is a ketone,  2-Butanone is produced in large quantities. Nearly half of it is used in paints and other coatings because it will quickly evaporate. It dissolves many substances and is used as a solvent in processes involving gums, resins, cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate. It is also used in the synthetic rubber industry, in the production of paraffin wax and in household products such as lacquer, varnishes, paint remover, as a denaturing agent for denatured alcohol, glues and as a cleaning agent. It is used for synthesis of methyl ethyl ketone peroxide, a catalyst for some polymerization reactions. It is highly flammable. Some people who breathed air that contained MEK, also known as 2-butanone, first noticed its sweet, sharp odor at a concentration of 5-8 parts of 2-butanone per million parts of air (5-8 ppm). The main health effects that have been seen in humans who breathed higher concentrations of 2-butanone are mild irritation of the nose, throat, eyes, and skin. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set an occupational exposure limit of 200 ppm of 2-butanone in the air. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has also recommended 200 ppm of 2-butanone as the limit for up to a 10-hour work shift in a 40-hour workweek. Because of its odor, you can smell 2-butanone before it harms you.

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/phs29.html

 

 
4-phenylcyclohexene or 4 - PCH
A VOC released from the adhesive backing of new carpets and gives carpets that new carpet odor.
 


Acetaldehyde

It should be noted that residential fireplaces and wood stoves are the two highest sources of emissions, followed by various industrial emissions. Acetaldehyde is an air pollutant resulting from combustion, such as automotive exhaust and tobacco smoke, contributing to the addictive properties of tobacco.     

 

Acetic Acid
This may indicate vinegar or the presence of a silicone-type caulking.

 

Acetone
Acetone is often the primary (or only) component in nail polish remover. Very commonly found during residential and commercial IAQ testing. Acetonitrile, another organic solvent, is sometimes used as well. Acetone is also used as a super glue remover. It can be used for thinning and cleaning fiberglass resins and epoxies. It is a strong solvent for most plastics and synthetic fibers. The CDC says the following about acetone. Workers and people exposed to acetone in the lab complained that acetone irritated their noses, throats, lungs, and eyes. Some people feel this irritation at levels of 100 ppm acetone in the air, and more people feel the irritation as the level in air increases. The workers who complained of irritation were exposed to levels of 900 ppm or more. Workers exposed to acetone at 12,000 ppm or higher also complained of headache, lightheadedness, dizziness, unsteadiness, and confusion depending on how long they were exposed (from 2 minutes to 4 hours). Two workers exposed for 4 hours became unconscious.  The regulation says workroom air should contain no more than an average of 750 ppm. Most people can smell acetone in the air at 100 to 140 ppm; that means you will probably smell acetone before you feel effects like headache and confusion.http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/phs21.htmlThe Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set a maximum concentration limit in workplace air of 1,000 parts of acetone per million parts of air (1,000 ppm) for an 8-hour workday over a 40-hour week to protect workers.http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/tfacts21.html.  
 

 
Acetonitrile
Acetonitrile, an organic solvent, is sometimes used as fingernail polish remover.   
 


Benzaldehyde
It is commonly used as a food flavoring (almond flavor) or industrial solvent.
 

 
Butylcellosolve
Butylcellosolve may indicate use solvents, paint or paint removers. Paint VOCs can linger for as long as 18 months after painting. 
 
 
BTEX is an acronym that stands for  benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene
When found together these four chemicals are commonly abbreviated as BTEX.They are common gasoline indicators when found together. Low levels of such compounds indoors can be the result of gasoline contamination of clothes and hands that occurred from building occupants pumping gas. More elevated levels may indicate the presence of petroleum gas leaks spills, dumps, or improper storage etc. Benzene is a known carcinogen.   
 
 

Chloromethane
It has been detected at low levels in air all over the world.  Sources of exposure to methyl chloride include cigarette smoke, polystyrene insulation, and aerosol propellants; home burning of wood, coal, or certain plastics; and chlorinated swimming pools.  

 
Menthol, camphor, and methylsalicylate
These are often from scented topical ointments.

 

 

Cyclopentane
This is used in the manufacture of synthetic resins and rubber adhesives, and is a common blowing agent in foam insulation, such as those used in foam insulation for freezers and refrigerators etc.   it is considered safer for the environment than some previous blowing agents because it does not release ozone-depleting CFC's into the upper atmosphere.
 

 

Ethane  11 difluoro and also  ethane 1-chloro 11 - difluoro and Difluoro Chloromethane
These chemicals are common indoors and are typically from refrigerant leaks. VOC levels are read as parts per billion so this may be just a minor leak. Have your AC systems inspected and tested for refrigerant leaks if unusual levels of this compound are found during an indoor air quality investigation.

 
Ethyl Acetate
This is manufactured on a large scale for use as a solvent.  
 

Ethane  11 difluoro and also  ethane 1-chloro 11 - difluoro and Difluoro Chloromethane
These chemicals are common indoors and are typically from refrigerant leaks. VOC levels are read as parts per billion so this may be just a minor leak. Have your AC systems checked for refrigerant. 
 

 

Ethanol and isopropyl alcohol
The above alcohols are very common indoors. They come from a wide variety of house old products and personal care products.

 

Formaldehyde
Formaldehyde is found in homes and workplaces during indoor air quality investigations. It is a colorless, pungent-smelling gas. It has also been shown to cause cancer in animals and may cause cancer in humans. Health effects include eye, nose, and throat irritation; wheezing and coughing; fatigue; skin rash; severe allergic reactions. Formaldehyde is one of the more common indoor air pollutants. Some common sources of formaldehyde are pressed wood products (hardwood plywood wall paneling, particle board, fiberboard and furniture), combustion sources, environmental tobacco smoke, durable press drapes, other textiles, and glues.
Average concentrations in older homes without UFFI are generally well below 0.1 (ppm). In homes with significant amounts of new pressed wood products, levels can be greater than 0.3 ppm.In some humans exposed at elevated levels above 0.1 parts per million formaldehyde can cause watery eyes, burning sensations in the eyes and throat, nausea, and difficulty in breathing.The above info is from the EPA website:  http://www.epa.gov/iaq/formalde.html  
 

 

Ethanol and isopropyl alcohol
The above alcohols are very common indoors. They come from a wide variety of household products and personal care products. 
   

 

Limonene and d-Limonene
This is added to cleaning products such as hand cleansers to give a lemon-orange scent. It is increasingly being used as an environmentally friendly alternative to mineral oils and as a solvent for cleaning purposes, such as the removal of oil from machine parts. It is also used in odorants, air fresheners, pot pourri, and perfumes.
 

 
Pinene or Alpha -pinene
This is added to cleaning products such as pine cleaner like formulas to give a pine scent. It is increasingly being used as an environmentally friendly alternative to mineral oils and as a solvent for cleaning purposes, such as the removal of oil from machine parts. It is also used in odorants, air fresheners, pot pourri, and perfumes.  

 

 
Methylene chloride
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set limits of 25 parts methylene chloride per million parts of workplace air (25 ppm) for 8-hour shifts and 40-hour work weeks.It is used as an industrial solvent and as a paint stripper. It may also be found in some aerosol and pesticide products and is used in the manufacture of photographic film. If you breathe in large amounts of methylene chloride, you may feel unsteady, dizzy, and have nausea and a tingling or numbness of your finger and toes. A person breathing smaller amounts of methylene chloride may become less attentive and less accurate in tasks requiring hand-eye coordination. Skin contact with methylene chloride causes burning and redness of the skin

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/tfacts14.html

 

 
Menthol
This is often found in mint scented topical ointments. 
 
 
Methylcyclohexane
Methylcyclohexane may indicate use of paint, solvents,  or paint removers. Paint VOCs can linger for as long as 18 months after painting. 
 
Methylsalicylate

This is often found im scented topical ointments.

 
Naphthalene
This is the active component often in older mothballs. 

 

 
Perchloroethylene - Other names include tetrachloroethylene, PCE, and tetrachloroethene.
CAS#: 127-18-4
Tetrachloroethylene is a manufactured chemical used for dry cleaning and metal degreasing. Exposure to very high concentrations of tetrachloroethylene can cause dizziness, headaches, sleepiness, confusion, nausea, difficulty in speaking and walking, unconsciousness, and death. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has determined that tetrachloroethylene may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen. Tetrachloroethylene has been shown to cause liver tumors in mice and kidney tumors in male rats.

It is a nonflammable liquid at room temperature. It evaporates easily into the air and has a sharp, sweet odor. Most people can smell tetrachloroethylene when it is present in the air at a level of 1 part tetrachloroethylene per million parts of air (1 ppm) or more, although some can smell it at even lower levels. The EPA maximum contaminant level for the amount of tetrachloroethylene that can be in drinking water is 0.005 milligrams tetrachloroethylene per liter of water (0.005 mg/L).The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set a limit of 100 ppm for an 8-hour workday over a 40-hour workweek.The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that tetrachloroethylene be handled as a potential carcinogen and recommends that levels in workplace air should be as low as possible. PCE, CAS#: 127-18-4 Tetrachloroethylene is a manufactured chemical used for dry cleaning and metal degreasing. Exposure to very high concentrations of tetrachloroethylene can cause dizziness, headaches, sleepiness, confusion, nausea, difficulty in speaking and walking, unconsciousness, and death. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has determined that tetrachloroethylene may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen. Tetrachloroethylene has been shown to cause liver tumors in mice and kidney tumors in male rats.Other names for tetrachloroethylene include perchloroethylene, PCE, and tetrachloroethene. It is a nonflammable liquid at room temperature. It evaporates easily into the air and has a sharp, sweet odor. Most people can smell tetrachloroethylene when it is present in the air at a level of 1 part tetrachloroethylene per million parts of air (1 ppm) or more, although some can smell it at even lower levels. 
 
 

TolueneToluene may indicate use of paint or paint removers. Paint VOCs can linger for as long as 18 months after painting. Toluene can be used as an octane booster in gasoline fuels. 

 

Tetrahydrofuran
THF is a moderately polar, aprotic solvent. It is able to dissolve a wide range of compounds. 

 
Vinyl AcetateThe major effects experienced from breathing high levels of vinyl acetate for a short time are irritated eyes, nose, and throat.The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) has established an exposure limit of 10 parts of vinyl acetate per million parts of workplace air (10 ppm) for an 8-hour workday, 40-hour workweek.The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that exposure to vinyl acetate in the workplace not exceed 4 ppm over a 15-minute period.Inhalation can cause severe irritation of mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract. Symptoms may include burning sensation, coughing, wheezing, and laryngitis, shortness of breath, headache, nausea and vomiting. High concentrations may cause lung damage. It is an irritant to the nose, throat, and upper respiratory tract. Exposures to high concentrations have a narcotic effect and may cause liver and kidney damage.Airborne Exposure Limits: -OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL): 400 ppm (TWA)-ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV): 400 ppm (TWA), A4 - Not classifiable as a human carcinogen. http://www.jtbaker.com/msds/englishhtml/e2850.htm. 
 
 
Xylene
Xylene may indicate use of paint or paint removers. Paint VOCs can linger for as long as 18 months after painting.  

 

 
   

 

 

 

 
  
  

If you suspect odors, allergens, mold, or volitile organic compound (VOC) chemicals, to be a problem in your home or office building, and you live in the South East Florida areas of Miami, West Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Davie, Weston, Kendall, Fort Perice, or Port St Lucie, feel free to give us a call at: 1888- 381-6651. We offer testing and inspections for mold, allergens, and chemicals in all these areas and have provided consultation services for several years now. 

 

 


Mold inspector mold testing indoor air West Palm Beach Lauderdale to Miami.